Getting Over Yourself

March 4, 2010

Can you stand still? Please.

Filed under: Observations — Barbara Rocha @ 9:31 am
Tags: , , ,

While moving around a stage can add to a presentation, it can also subtract from it. The difference is if the movement is with purpose. If standing in one place makes you uncomfortable then speaking itself probably makes you uncomfortable with the result that you’re not in charge of your body or your presentation.

You’d be more powerful standing still and speaking with focus and energy than you’d be if you’re charging around the stage, rocking, pacing, shifting because you’re anxious, unsure, unfocused and not in your right mind.

The goal is to be in your right mind, know what you’re thinking, saying, doing. Then, if you move, it will be with purpose. Communication anxiety is not your friend. And neither is unintended movement. Learn to speak standing still so you can be in charge.

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2 Comments »

  1. I have seen different opinions on this recently. I certainly agree that you exhibit more “presence” when standing in one position. It is also less distracting for the audience. However, with the recent business trends toward socialization, I am reading more and more about a speaker’s need to exhibit more energy in a presention through movement. The goal seems to be to engage the audience more directly. Any opinions on this?

    Comment by Jim Locke — April 28, 2010 @ 1:12 pm | Reply

    • You’re right. Purposeful movement is good. If you’re in control of your body, it’s easier to exhibit energy in a way that engages the audience. If you can’t stand still, I’ve noticed that all that energy popping out can be counterproductive and may be seen in frantic gestures, rapid eye movement and rocking, pacing, and shifting–all of which tend to distract rather than engage.

      My plea for standing still is to conquer all the inadvertent inappropriate movement so you can get to the place where you know that you’re moving and know that it’s helping, not hurting.

      Comment by Barbara Rocha — April 30, 2010 @ 10:36 am | Reply


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