Getting Over Yourself

November 28, 2012

When did “you’re welcome” become “no problem?”

Filed under: Tips — Barbara Rocha @ 10:36 am
Tags: , , ,

Please. Practice saying “you’re welcome.” When I thank someone, it’s sometimes just a social nicety to keep things easy. And when they answer, “no problem” it’s annoying. Because they often haven’t really done anything. And it totally changes the dynamic in almost every situation. I heard my granddaughter say it to someone the other day and I’m pretty sure that what she meant was, “I didn’t really want to be here and do that for you, but don’t lose any sleep over it.”

“No problem” often just puts the other person in a lesser position. I’m sure that many times that person isn’t really thinking — they’re just giving a robotic answer. So, if I had my druthers, I’d rather have a robotic, “you’re welcome.”

And along those same lines, listen when people are being interviewed and the interviewer says, “thank you.” The majority of the time, the person being interviewed also says, “thank you.” I’ve noticed that when they say, “you’re welcome,” I like it better. Now, if they were promoting a book, or in some other way benefited from the interview, perhaps “thank you,” is appropriate. But when their role was to offer their expertise, then “you’re welcome,” seems more appropriate.

But wait, there’s more. A somewhat related topic is whether to say “thank you” when you finish giving a speech. If you’re going to say it, you should have a reason and not just have it be a knee-jerk reaction to finishing or because you don’t have an actual close and want your audience to know you’re through. Those are not good reasons for finishing that way. And if you do say it, be sure you’ve let your point sink in before you say it. Otherwise, you’ve just stepped on the point you wanted to make and weakened the impact.

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