Getting Over Yourself

October 24, 2013

Breaking the rules of speaking and getting it right

Filed under: Observations — Barbara Rocha @ 10:16 am
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I love this video. It’s totally inspirational to lift your day and your life. And, he’s an amazing speaker who does things most people can’t get away with.

http://poptech.org/popcasts/benjamin_zander__poptech_2008

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October 18, 2013

Start by not boring yourself

Filed under: Tips — Barbara Rocha @ 9:53 am
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I hate to be bored. And what could be sadder than boring myself when I’m speaking? At least I have control over that one and most presentations would be considerably better if the presenter refused to be bored.

One place to start is to see how you can avoid doing it “the way it’s always been done” – and still be appropriate.

Here are a few ways to do this:

  • Identify an aspect of the subject that you find interesting.
  • Look for a link to a current hot topic.
  • Don’t think of it as a report you have to give. Instead see it in context of the big picture and the connections it has to the interests of your audience–how they can use it to save them time, money, or aggravation.

Whether you’re in the audience, or in front of the audience, you’re the one who decides whether or not you’re bored. You have the power to make the right choice by thinking about the subject in a different way.

October 4, 2013

Really! You’re going to open your presentation with that?

Filed under: Tips — Barbara Rocha @ 9:36 am
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It’s so tempting to start with what you’re going to cover. Yet, it’s almost impossible to say that in a way that will stop them from texting.

Regardless of the audience, there’s something you can say that will let people know they need to listen up. Someone in a class this last week started with, “We have a problem.” He said it with authority and stopped to let it sink in. And everyone paid close attention.

Awhile ago someone started with, “First I’m going to give you a headache and then I’m going to give you an aspirin.”

So, for those of you who think your audience would be turned off if you did an opening, rather than start with what you’re going to cover, you can see those two examples didn’t take enough time for the audience to object.

For other audiences, you might start with a story or an example that illustrates your point, or some statistics that highlight the problem, or a current news story that’s relevant.

It’s hard to break the habit of announcing “this is what I’m going to talk about” as the first thing you say. But more people will listen if you do. Give them a reason to listen first, and then tell them what you’re talking about.

It’s more interesting and it should be easier for you, too.

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